Black Friday Sale! Save 30% on LexJet & Sunset Media

There’s no need to wake up early and fight crowds for Black Friday deals from LexJet. Save 30% off MSRP on your favorite LexJet and Sunset branded media when you purchase online from Friday, Nov. 29 through Sunday, Dec. 1.

Now is the time to stock up on some of your favorites like:

Or try some of our new products like:

Products for latex, eco-solvent/solvent printers include display films and fabrics while LexJet branded aqueous media offers a variety of fine art, photo papers, and high-end canvas. If you are printing with dye-sub, choose from an assorted line of InFuze transfer papers.

Remember, LexJet will be closed on Thursday and Friday, so this promotion is only valid online – while supplies last – through Sunday, and orders will ship on the next available business day. Use coupon code FRIDAY30 at checkout to apply your 30% savings.

C’est Magnifique! Turning Antique French Postcards into Wall Art

Baton Rouge, La., photographer David Humphreys was approached by Mike Wampold, CEO of the Wampold Companies, to produce art for Bayonne at Southshore, a new apartment complex just off the Louisiana State University campus. “He had these French postcards that he wanted to turn into 5-foot by 8-foot murals,” Humphreys says.

It wasn’t just the antique postcards that would serve as the inspiration for the canvas prints. “Veni Harlan, a specialist in marsh species, helped me find the proper flora and fauna of the LSU lakes,” Humphreys says. “Also, Mr. Wampold knows that there are a large number of pelicans that fly in and stay in the LSU lakes, and that’s how the pelican became the symbol for the apartment complex.”

Once he started experimenting with the process, he knew it was going to be an intricate and detailed project. “I used a high-end Phase One camera, mounted a camera stand and shot them in six or eight sections,” he says. “Then I stitched them together in Photoshop to get an accurate 800 Mb file. I didn’t want to turn them into vector files because I wanted to maintain the integrity of the images.”

Humphreys needed to incorporate the pelicans and other species into the artwork, so he reached out to Gerald Burns, a friend, and former priest-turned-wildlife photographer. “I do a lot of fine art printing for Father Burns,” Humphreys says. “He had some old photos of birds and reptiles that he’d taken over the years, but some were lower pixel ratings. I printed them using LexJet Premium Archival Matte Paper, mounted the prints and, then used the same stitching process I used with the postcards.”

When it came time to print the final art pieces, Humphreys needed to find a printer that would provide a full 60-inch bleed. “After researching all the printers available, the Canon PRO-6000 stood out as being most advanced in technology,” he says. “The printer is incredible. It’s user-friendly and did a beautiful job. Now I’m doing a lot of larger images for other people because of the 60-inch capability.”

After the murals were printed, Humphreys reached out to some friends to help with finishing and installing. “Vivid Ink mounted the prints to custom boards, then they were delivered to Ann Connelly Fine Art for custom framing. Then Vivid Ink did the installation at the apartments,” he says.

With 42 years of photography experience, Humphreys says he was inspired to start printing by an unlikely source: Graham Nash of Crosby, Stills, and Nash. “Graham’s father was a photographer and he got into fine art printing pre-inkjet. Now he owns Nash Editions in California, one of the pre-eminent fine art printing companies in the country,” he says. “He inspired me to print for myself. Ann [Connelly] loved what I was doing, so I branched out and started printing for her and other people.”

Whether printing his own work or helping others create museum-worthy pieces, David Humphreys knows the benefits of partnering with the right people and using the right equipment to turn an idea into reality.

To learn more about creative applications or to find out which printer is right for you, contact a LexJet specialist at 800-453-9538 or visit LexJet.com.

Made in the Shade: Fine Art Paper Adds an Artsy Finish

Getting a glimpse into Michael Macone’s world is a crafty art-lover’s dream. Macone runs The Potter’s Shed in Shell Lake, Wis., a cool art gallery-meets cafe-meets do-it-yourself art space-meets music venue. “It’s 50,000 square feet of art fun,” he says. He also runs Macone Clay, where he creates all sorts of clay projects including lamps, bowls, cups, plaques and much more.

One of Macone’s most popular items is the artsy lamps, which are almost entirely created in-house. The wood base is made in the woodshop, the body is extruded clay that’s manipulated while it’s still wet. The shade is printed on LexJet Sunset Textured Fine Art Paper 310g.

When he first began making the lamps, he was purchasing shades from a home supply store and hand-painting each one. “That was a lot of fun for a while … but the painting was arduous and stressful,” he says. “We had to be careful not to over-saturate the paint, and eventually it turned into a big bother rather than fun.”

But the lamps, which sell for $225, were gaining popularity, and he needed a solution. That’s when he came across printed lamp shades at a wholesale event, and decided to give it a try. “It was a big learning curve getting the template in the digital realm, but we figured it out,” he says. He was working with a different brand of paper, which was fine, he says, but his LexJet rep introduced him to the Textured Fine Art Paper, and he made the switch.

“It ended up being thicker and felt better on the frame,” Macone says. “It looked noticeably better, which surprised us. When we compared it – the color just snapped more.”

Macone’s lamp shade designs start sometimes as pencil sketches or photos or paintings that he manipulates in Photoshop to get the final design that pairs best with the lamp’s body, which is painted and enhanced with melted glass that drips elegantly down the edge.

He offers four lamp base styles and 20 shade options, and sells about 500 lamps a year through YouNeedArtNow.com, in The Potter’s Shed gallery and at art fairs around the country.

A long-time LexJet customer, Macone also uses his Epson wide-format printer to create collages with sweet artwork and sayings that are adhered to wooden plaques. For those, he opts for LexJet Premium Archival Matte Paper, which he finishes with a UV coating that he also utilizes for the lamp shades.

“It’s a good quality photo paper that we’ve been using for a couple of years,” he says. “We always have lots of colors [in our designs] and just have a lot of fun with the art.”

Freeflow Art: Giving Untapped Talent a Place to Thrive

When Marco Hope was incarcerated for 14 years, he didn’t waste his time. In fact, he set about completely revamping himself through reading and introspection. He also found a way to overhaul his career when he realized he was surrounded by a lot of untapped, unrecognized artists serving time with him.

“When you’re in jail, your family can send you funds to buy food other than what they serve and things like that,” Hope says. “What I would do with that money was buy art [from other inmates].”

Deep Discounts on Select LexJet Photo Papers End on Sept. 4

Deep Discounts at LexJetThere are only five business days left (including today) to take advantage of deep discounts on select LexJet photo papers:

Save up to 40 percent, and even more on some roll sizes, on the LexJet photo papers listed above. Here are some examples of the staggering savings you can realize if you act before Sept. 4:

Call a LexJet printing expert at 800-453-9538 or order online at lexjet.com to stock up before this special promotion ends on Thursday, Sept. 4.

Then, on Friday, Sept. 5, check back here at blog.lexjet.com for the next dynamite deal.

Artisan Craftsman Books on Sunset Photo Canvas Paper

Artisan Craftsman Books

As the name implies, Artisan Craftsman Books specializes in hand-crafted fine-art photo books. Owner Larry Crandall is also a veteran photographer of 30-plus years who knows how photography can be maximized in a photo book.

Wedding Book by Artisan Craftsman Books
Larry Crandall of Artisan Craftsman Books used Sunset Photo Canvas Paper for the page spreads inside the book and a portion of the cover. He used a protective spray on the cover and placed the book inside a clamshell case to showcase it and provide additional protection.

As a fine-art photo book maker, Crandall typically uses matte paper, and most often LexJet Premium Archival Matte Paper, for the photo pages within the book. “We specialize in matte, giclee-printed books; we don’t do photographic or press-printed books,” adds Crandall.

With the introduction of Sunset Photo Canvas Paper 230g, Crandall may have found a new staple for his photo books, not as a replacement, but as an excellent textured option. He tried the new paper for the first time on a wedding photography book that was also printed on Premium Archival Matte.

Wedding Book Cover“I’m not laminating the Sunset Photo Canvas in order to let the texture show through. Instead, I spray it with a protective spray and I think it’s durable enough. It’s pretty neat looking; it has a matte, fine-art finish and I really like it,” says Crandall.

The pages are printed on an Epson 7890 as a full-page spread. Crandall uses the auto-cut feature on the printer to make it easy to stack up the sheets in order, then trims the edges and scores the middle of the spread so that the pages are ready for binding. This particular wedding book is about 50 pages, or 25 full-page spreads, all printed on Sunset Photo Canvas Paper.

Artisan Craftsman Books Wedding Album
A close-up showing both the detail and texture achieved with Sunset Photo Canvas Paper.

“I was concerned that the texture might take away from the detail, where it runs over someone’s eye or other facial feature. That’s not the case. It still prints beautifully,” says Crandall. “You get a little better continuous tone from Premium Archival Matte in certain areas. What I like is the texture itself, which has a nice feel. A large part of these books is the touch and feel, which doesn’t apply as much when you hang it on a wall.”