Introducing: LexJet Sunset Production Satin Canvas SUV

For photography and fine art reproduction shops, LexJet Sunset Production Satin Canvas SUV is the all-new solution for high-volume production that demands consistent results for the creative digital market.

The new canvas, launching Oct. 25, is a U.S.-made 100 percent polyester canvas with the look and feel of a traditional, 2-over-1 poly-cotton weave. Compatible with solvent, eco-solvent, latex and UV-curable printers, this versatile canvas is a cost-effective alternative that doesn’t require a coating for a satin finish.

Maxwell D1
This print, titled “NY NY,” is available at

Los Angeles-based Maxwell Dickson, which specializes in digital canvas décor art, tested the new product and has since put in an order to bring it on as a go-to canvas. “We’re going to use it — that’s the best endorsement I can give anyone,” says Kashif Shaheed, manager at Maxwell Dickson.

“We prefer for our canvas to have a cloth feel to it, so it looks like authentic canvas – not too plastic,” he says. “People confuse it with vinyl if it looks too manufactured.”

Because Maxwell Dickson prints more than 100 prints per month that range in a variety of sizes from 16-by-20 inches to 40-by-60 inches, the fact that this new canvas comes in 150-foot rolls is a bonus.

“We use at least 12 rolls of the 75-foot rolls each month,” he says. “We’d prefer not to change out the rolls as often, so that’s really one of the biggest selling points for us.”

To learn more about the launch of LexJet’s Sunset Production Satin Canvas SUV, call us at 800-453-9538.

Insider Tip: How to Create Tiles for Large Wall Graphics

When it comes to tiling large graphics for wallcoverings, starting with a well-designed graphic that’s prepped off-site is one of the best ways to make sure your installation is a success. Here are three great tips on how to tile your graphic and prep for installation.

1. Site Inspection

Tiling Wall Graphics

Test Surface: Start with a site inspection to test the wall to make sure your media is compatible because most zero or low VOC paints have additives that prevent adhesive from sticking to it.

Take Measurements & Photos: Once you’re sure it sticks, take measures so that your graphic designer has accurate dimensions of the wall and so they can allow at least a half-an-inch to a 1-inch bleed all around the graphic.

Also take lots of photos of the wall that is going to be used. Make sure you capture any potential obstacles, like power outlets and light fixtures that need to be avoided.

2. Tiling & Mock-up

Tiling Wall Graphics

Create Overlapping Tiles: Column tiling is best for large wall graphics. This means the overlaps will be on the left and right edges of the print. The size material you’re printing on determines the number of tiles to be installed. Whether you’re using cast or calendered film, a 1/2-inch to 1-inch overlap is best.

Using RIP software for tiling makes the printing process easier by ensuring your overlaps will be correct, plus there’s no need for a separate file per tile as there is when you use Photoshop or Illustrator. However, if you don’t have RIP software, check out our video on tiling graphics in Photoshop, included below.

Print & Label Mock-up: Once your design and file setup is complete, print a downscaled mock-up of the graphic on a piece of paper. Label the tiling sequence and include the actual dimensions and distance between tiles.

3. Label & Roll

Tiling Wall Graphics

Color Check & Trim: After your prints are dry and ready, separate them on a large table and cut the white, unprinted edges off of each tile. If you leave an inch of white edge above the top of each print, you will have the hard edge of the print to align with.

Now, carefully align the overlaps of two adjacent tiles and check them for color consistency and that they overlap correctly. Repeat this on all the panels.

Label Panels & Roll-up in Order: Your last step is to roll up each print on a core in reverse order and then label each tile to match the mock-up print, as shown above. Be sure to use a ball-point pen instead of a marker so the ink doesn’t smear on your prints. Your graphic is now ready for the job site.

Congratulations! You’ve just helped your installer avoid frustration and potential costly mistakes.

Video: Tiling Graphics in Photoshop:

Getting Started with In-House Printing: The Advantages, Challenges & Lessons Learned

So, you’re thinking about bringing wide-format printing in-house? With today’s print technologies and the outstanding quality they offer, it’s hard to resist the many benefits of bringing wide-format printing in-house. Plus, wide-format printing is in demand now more than ever.

Even with the tremendous growth of online digital content, wide-format print will always remain relevant as we live in a world where every product or brand attempts to garner more attention than the next.  But are there any pitfalls in bringing wide-format printing in-house?  Let’s look at whether printing in-house with wide-format is right for you.

Advantages of bringing wide-format printing in-house:

Capabilities – Printing wide-format in-house can open a plethora of opportunities depending on what your wants and needs are. In-house print operators running wide-format printers can produce everything from product packaging, proofing, retail/point-of-purchase signage to fine-art reproduction just to name a few.

Easy Ways to Start Marketing Your Décor Services Today

Whether you’ve got full décor printing capabilities, or you’re just dipping your toe into this new market, everyone will eventually need to start marketing their services to build business. We sat down with LexJet’s market development pro Rachel Gamberg to learn how to get a décor-focused marketing plan off the ground.

“Based on your equipment and current capabilities, you can identify markets that you can created product lines for and start to segment these groups,” she says. “And if you have plans to invest in new equipment, started thinking about more applications you can offer in the future.”

Save with Lower Pricing on 6.5 Mil Gloss Opaque Display Film

For applications that range from durable retractable banner stands and pop-up trade show displays to high-end competition photo prints and glass-mounted fine art, LexJet 6.5 Mil Gloss Opaque Display Film is now priced at $0.67 per square foot.

PD-Photo-350x288This strong, lay-flat film is comprised of 100% polyester, and it’s now available at the price of a polypropylene or blended product. At a 6.5 mil weight, it can be laminated on both sides to create nearly indestructible graphics that are still easy to handle, making it ideal for pop-up or roll-up trade show displays and banner stands.

“We use it to set our banner stands and graphics apart because it images super clean and super sharp, plus the color matching is dead on every time,” Jason Price, owner of GraphX Direct, has commented about 6.5 Mil Gloss Opaque Display Film.

Plus, with its instant-dry, high-gloss finish, it’s a natural choice for photographers who want ultra-detailed prints that are worthy of competition. It also works seamlessly when face-mounted to glass, making it a go-to option for décor applications.

To learn more about the versatility of this product, call your LexJet print specialist today at 800-453-9538.

Prints That Win: Morning on Mormon Row

A few quiet days alone in Grand Teton National Park was highly worthwhile for Sunset Print Award winning photographer, Jaki Miller. Although she is no stranger to the beauty of Mormon Row, an early morning sunrise gave her an entirely new perspective.

“I got there about a half hour before it was even light enough to see and before anyone even got there. I just didn’t want to miss it.” She set up her Fuji X-T1 on a tripod and began to capture the simplistic beauty as the sun started to rise.

The early sunlight was breathtaking, turning the mountains shades of pink and purple. Miller, however, wanted the rustic barn to be the star. She converted the picture to black and white using the Nik Silver Efex Pro and allowed the scene’s true beauty to shine through.