Top Tip: Flatten Curly Prints in a Flash

Using high-end photo or fine-art papers like LexJet’s Sunset Photo eSatin Paper 300g or Sunset Hot Press Rag 310g delivers the premium, darkroom-style results that photographers and fine art reproduction printers demand. However, the thicker papers have one side effect: They curl as they come off the printer.

As we demonstrate in the video above, getting the curl out of your finished photo prints can be simple with a few items you already have in your facility. You’ll just need:

  • A printed photo
  • An empty media roll
  • Some scrap canvas
  • Tape
  • Velcro media wrap (optional)

Watch the video above, which will walk you through the quick steps. The whole process only takes a few minutes. Once your print is de-curled, you’ll be able to make a much nicer final presentation to your customer.

Like this tip? Share it with your friends and comment below to let us know what other tips and tricks you’d like to see on the LexJet blog.

Fine Art & Photo Repro Pros Prefer Sunset by Fredrix Matte Canvas

Printers who specialize in producing fine art and photo reproduction have their own set of requirements that canvas must deliver, such as high white levels, ease of use and excellent image and color quality. That’s why many providers who offer high-end gallery wraps, for example, rely on LexJet Sunset by Fredrix Matte Canvas.

“We’ve been using the Sunset by Fredrix canvas for about four months now,” says Chris Capel from The UPS Store, Aurora, OH, who uses the canvas on his new Epson SureColor P9000 printer. “The image quality is outstanding, and flesh tones are beautiful.”

Prints that Win: City by the Sea

“Breathtaking” is a fitting description for the image “City by the Sea” by Kathryn Meek, a photographer and winner of the Sunset Print Award at the APPA competition in Arkansas.

After spending the day in Croatia, Meek set up a tripod and her Nikon D700 on the top of the cruise ship, and took a series of pictures of the coast of Dubrovnik, Croatia. It took her 10 to 15 minutes to shoot several different sequences of photographs of the coastline. After finding the series she liked best, Meek photo-merged them together using Photoshop, thus creating the winning image. (Click on the image above to see the full image.)

Tip of the Week: Picking the Best Media for Printing Posters

Do you know where to start when choosing the best media for printing posters? We sat down with LexJet product guru, Jeff Leto, and talked about how important it is to determine the best weight, size and finish for your posters.

When you’re looking for the right poster material, pay close attention to its gram weight. A lighter gram weight is meant for things like movie posters or smaller signage, while a heavier gram weight is best for large window displays. The larger the sign, the heavier the gram weight should be in order to ensure a flat, smooth surface.

The finish is also an important factor when finding the perfect poster material. There are lots to choose from like matte, satin, semi-matte, gloss and high-gloss. The finish of the poster depends on the environment the poster will be displayed in. Some great examples of different finishes would be the Sunset Photo Gloss, the LexJet HydroTOUGH Poster and the HP Photo-realistic Poster Paper. All of these materials are compatible with latex printers, so you know you’re getting durable, cost-effective posters for all your business needs.

Check out our Latex Applications page for more on posters and the many ways you can use latex printing technology in your business. Call a LexJet printing expert at 800-453-9538 to learn more.

Prints that Win: Waiting for You

Waiting for You

Each portrait Kristi Elias creates is a unique work of art that is relevant and appropriate to its subject. Last year, Elias won a Sunset Print Award at the Professional Photographers of California state competition for You Won’t Bully Me, a grungy portrait of a young martial arts competitor.

Elias followed up this year, taking home another Sunset Print Award at the California competition for a decidedly different subject, entitled Waiting for You. This portrait purposely evokes Renaissance art.

“I wanted a painterly feel with a lot of detail in the props, like the bottle. There’s note in the bottle, and you can see the contours and the detail. There was a lot of time put into those details of the portrait. You can see even the music on the floor, and all the shading and detail in it. I did it just like it would have been as a Renaissance painting, and how they paid so much attention to detail on all the props,” explains Elias.

The portrait of her client, who also poses for Elias to spark modeling ideas, was captured in the studio. Elias purchased a custom dress from Bulgaria for an authentic touch.

Elias added a new background, a photo she took of a Gothic cathedral in Tuscany. She used Photoshop, Nik Software and Alien Skin to edit the image.

“When I edit I don’t use the same actions every time. I look at each portrait as its own piece of art. Some of it is my own custom actions, and some of it is edited with Nik Software to bring out the detail in the shadows. I like to put a lot of detail in the shadow for that hopeless romantic look. I took any painterly effect off of her skin so there’s no texture on the skin, because that doesn’t go well with judging,” says Elias.

Master printer Jonathan Penney, Center Moriches, N.Y., printed the image on a fibre-based paper to complete the beautiful, Renaissance-style portrait.

Prints that Win: Chaotic Profiling

Sunset Print Award“I like surrealism,” says Elaine Hughes. That much is evident in Hughes’ Sunset Print Award-winning piece entitled Chaotic Profiling. Hughes also won a Sunset Print Award in 2013 for the surreal and aptly titled Dream World.

Chosen by judges at the recent PhotoPro Expo 2015 Print Competition in Covington, Ky., Chaotic Profiling was hard to overlook, and look again to catch all the subtleties in the dreamlike world Hughes created.

“There are many ways to interpret life. In this image we see the profile of the main subject intertwined with a secondary version of itself. This way of looking at things can create chaotic thoughts. The concept of my image is the end result,” says Hughes.

Note the child enjoying his time by the ear of the main figure. “Maybe he lives here in this strange, chaotic and magical place,” adds Hughes.

Hughes’ surreal dreamscapes take months to create as she gathers photos she takes on her travels with her husband and former Sunset Print Award winner Robert Hughes and combines them into one cohesive (or chaotic, as the case may be) image.

“I take photographs everywhere I go. It could be something in the hotel room, outside the door, or anything I find interesting that I might be able to use. I also study a lot of animated films and art for inspiration,” she says.

All the photographs are combined in Photoshop and blended in multiple layers. With hue and saturation Hughes finds just the right color scheme to convey her concept. For this one, the plays on blue seemed just right to her.