Quick-change Retail Graphics? You’ve Got Options

Retail promotions can change in the blink of an eye, which means you need a quick turnaround for replacement graphics that make an impression. Since the graphics could be applied by anybody from the summer intern to a pro installer, it’s important that the products are easy to handle and properly protected.

Check out some of these proven applications that offer alternatives for displaying retail images, especially when the project requires speed, protection, easy removal and, of course, high quality:

Clearly, There Are Alternate Ways to Display Images: If you have been looking for new ways to display your graphics, why not turn your posters into instant window graphics? With LexJet CrystalClear-X Removable Adhesive, you can front-mount graphics with bubble-free ease. If your plans change within the first 12 hours of application, you can reposition the graphics up to 10 times. There is no residue left behind, making removal a breeze. LexJet CrystalClear-X Removable Adhesive can be used with images you are already creating on aqueous, latex, solvent or eco-solvent printers.

4 Ways to Step Up Your Floor Graphics

Floor graphics aren’t just for retail anymore. They provide an easy way to create ambiance for special events, turn bland walkways into brilliant displays, and even provide directional signage in the most unusual places. Here are a few examples from customers who have stepped outside the point-of-purchase box:

Wicked-cool Décor: Mark Hawkins of Mark Hawkins Photography took the “Wicked” theme of a recent fundraiser gala to new heights. Hawkins was tasked with bringing the world of Oz to life, and he turned to LexJet Print-N-Stick Fabric to create graphics such as the iconic Yellow Brick Road, informational signage and what looked to be the poor Wicked Witch squashed by one of the bars. With its versatility, spot-on colors and ease of install and removal, Print-N-Stick was the go-to choice to create fun, customized graphics for the event.

Video Tip: Install Floor Graphics Using the Hinge Method

Floor graphics are becoming more popular in retail spaces, with new products that make installation as easy as 1, 2, 3: print, peel and stick.

In the video above, we demonstrate an easy hinge method to keep the graphic in place while you apply it to the floor. All you’ll need is your printed graphic, painters tape, a squeegee and a pair of scissors.

To install the graphic, simply:

  • place the graphic where you want it
  • create a hinge in the center of the graphic
  • peel the liner away from the top hinge and trim it off
  • squeegee the exposed adhesive from the center out
  • remove hinge and repeat those steps on the bottom half of the graphic

LexJet offers a variety of products that work with this quick and easy method. They include:

LexJet Print-N-Stick Fabric: Photographic image quality with high ink saturation

LexJet Solvent Print-N-Stick Fabric: Smoother weave with satin sheen for photographic detail

panoRama Walk & Wall: Slip-resistant certified without a laminate

LexJet Simple Indoor FloorAd: Durable solution that can withstand heavy floor traffic

LexJet Extreme AquaVinyl w/PSA: Long-lasting, waterproof with permanent adhesive

Photo Tex PSA Fabric – Aqueous: Won’t rip, wrinkle or shrink

Photo Tex PSA Fabric – Solvent: Great for windows and walls, too

Get Inspired: 10 of Our Favorite Customer Projects of 2015

Throughout the year, we’ve been awed and inspired by the innovative work our customers have created: from wall murals and tote bags to gallery exhibits and social statements. As the year draws to a close, we’ve been reflecting on some of our favorites, and thought we’d share them with you again. While there were many more excellent projects that we featured over the year, here are 10 of the blogs we thought our readers would enjoy revisiting as much as we did:

6 FInishedChurch’s Sleek New Student Center: Clear Lake Press transformed St. Thomas More Catholic Newman Center in the Minnesota State University Campus’ student center into a fun gathering spot. “It was one of those projects, when it started, I was extremely nervous about it,” says Eric Erickson, who used LexJet Print-N-Stick Fabric for the wall mural. “All of those nerves were laid to rest as we were installing it.

Lending a Hand to Contemporary Arts

CoCA featured image
The Center on Contemporary Art’s opening reception for “Change-Seed: Contemporary Art from Hong Kong and Beyond.” Photo credit: Annie Lukin

 

In late March, the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, Wash., opened a ground-breaking exhibit called Change-Seed, featuring a group of Hong Kong-based contemporary artists. The show, which runs through May 15, 2015, is a mixture of edgy prints, mixed media and video installations.

Although Hong Kong is a financial mecca for well-known artists, the lesser-known artists have very limited visibility, says Nichole DeMent, CoCA’s executive director.

“When we put the call out, we said to the artists: Let us be your voice,” DeMent says. “Let us tell your story that you weren’t able to tell in China.”

So CoCA curated an eclectic mix of art projects and asked the artists to send in digital files. CoCA then turned to Rock’s Studio, a fine art digital print service provider in Seattle. Stephen Rock, a multifaceted artist himself, contacted LexJet about the project, in hopes to acquire media to print the photographic works on.

Rock used Photo Tex, a printable self-adhesive polyester fabric, for large-scale prints, such as Laurent Segretier‘s “Untitled 17,” a 72-by-95-inch collage of what looks to be a cliff under construction, lined with vulnerable bamboo scaffolding. “It’s a big, gritty, dirty-looking print,” Rock says. He increased the scale of the artist’s work, which had several cut-out pieces around the print’s edges, which Rock decided to honor, creating a funky, urban piece.

“Since we had no budget to frame and mount these pieces, I suggested Photo Tex,” Rock says. “We can go really big with it and put the print right on the wall.”

He used his HP Designjet Z3100 printer (now available in the Z3200 model) for the prints. “HP just works so great on this material,” he says.

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Photography installations by artist Laurent Segretier: “Untitled 7,” “Untitled 15,” “Untitled 17” and “Untitled 24.”

 

Rock printed other photographic installations on Sunset Velvet Rag 315g. “As a printmaker, I just cringe at having to print big black areas on matte paper,” he says. “Any mishandling and those flat matte areas are prone to flaking. But with the Sunset Rag, it was like: Wow, these are deep and black and matte. They looked really sharp.”

Images in the prints included “Untitled 15,” objects wrapped with black trash bags and “Untitled 24,” an unidentifiable but intriguing image — guesses as to what it is range from rotting fabric to a dead insect.

“What are these guys trying to say, culture-wise,” Rock ponders. “Is it about consumption? There are so many layers and mystery. It’s very appropriate that they left it undefined.”

CoCA was thrilled to be a part of the dialog. “The artists appreciated the opportunity to have their work seen,” DeMent says. “It took them coming across the world to make that happen.”

Rock says he often does what he calls “benevolent printing” for projects like this, using as high-quality media as he has access to. “I don’t do cheap printing,” he says. “And thank you to LexJet, too, for helping. That’s what makes these shows work.”

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Yael Bronner Rubin’s “Connecting to the Spirits,” printed on Sunset Velvet Rag 315g.

Another Promotional Brick in the Wall

Faux Inkjet Printed Bricks Wall Mural

Brian likes bricks. See Brian make bricks… out of Photo Tex PSA Fabric – Solvent Printers from LexJet.

Brian is Brian Rogers, founder and CEO of Spectra Imaging in Louisville, Ky. He recently brought brick indoors to cover the outside of Spectra Imaging’s showroom.

Inkjet Printed Wall MuralThe outside of Spectra Imaging’s building is covered in brick so Rogers wanted to continue that theme inside to give the space more character, instead of just boring painted walls. More importantly, it makes visiting customers and prospects stop and look, and to ask how Spectra Imaging did it.

“We’ve had a lot of people say that when they first glanced at it they thought it was real brick. Then, the more they looked at it they realized that it wasn’t brick at all and wanted to know more about it,” says Rogers. “We’ve sold a lot of wall murals to companies that see it and want it on their walls; not necessarily brick, but once they know we can print any image on the material, then that’s what they want.”

Inkjet Printed Bathroom DecorAnd sometimes they do want brick, like the customer who requested a brick wall mural for their bathroom décor (pictured here).

“It’s great for companies to dress up their offices because they can use any image. And, if a year later they want to take it down, they can remove it without leaving any residue behind or damaging any of the drywall,” adds Rogers.

Ultimately, the interior décor at Spectra Imaging is a powerful sales tool. And what makes it that much more powerful in this case is the print of a seemingly infinite hallway in and amongst the “brick” on the back door of the showroom.

Rogers could have wrapped the door, but chose instead to print the image directly to a big piece of foam board with a flatbed UV-curable printer. Once the door handle and deadbolt were removed, the printed foam board was stuck to the door with double-sided tape.

The longer wall with just brick is 32 feet long and 82 1/2″ high; the shorter wall with the door is about 20 feet long and the same height. Rogers applied the brick graphics on the longer wall in two panels horizontally. The graphics for the shorter wall were applied in three panels horizontally.

“When we created the file we factored in the door and basically cut it out in the file. Then, we printed the top and bottom panels for the left and right side of the doors and a third smaller panel to apply above the door,” explains Rogers. “To make it as seamless as possible we apply it horizontally. A lot of people apply theirs in vertical panels, but even though it’s a little more difficult to apply it horizontally, I don’t like doing it that way because you create more seams. With this project there was only one seam on each wall in the middle of the wall. We also take our time and use two people for the installation. One person holds the roll and starts applying while the other pulls the release liner.”